Scroll to content

Interactive Bar

Translate
Bitterley C of E  Primary School

Bitterley C of E Primary School

"Be courageous; be strong. Do everything in love" (1 Corinthians 16:13-14)

Get In Touch

SEN

Bitterley Information Report

Where can the Shropshire Local Offer be found?

The Shropshire Local Offer brings together information about the help and support available for children and young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) and their families in Shropshire.

https://shropshire.gov.uk/the-send-local-offer/

 

What is our approach to teaching children with SEND?

At Bitterley CE Primary School, children with SEND receive an inclusive, aspirational and carefully sequenced curriculum which is broad and balanced. Support for children with SEND needs is based on true inclusion. Tasks are scaffolded, prior learning is clear and expectations are set out in smaller steps if needed. All children have equal access to resources, provision and interventions as needed. Regular assessment and careful tracking of individual children ensures every child continues to make progress regardless of their level of ability.

Staff are clear that pupils should not miss foundation curriculum time in order to complete interventions. Instead, careful timetabling, planned support and scaffolding is used to ensure pupils keep up rather than catch up. Children with SEND are encouraged to be independent, strategies are put in place to ensure pupils don’t become “stuck” but also so that they do not become reliant on only being able to start or complete a piece of work if sat with an adult.

There may however, be circumstances where the special educational provision goes beyond the differentiated approaches and learning arrangements normally provided as part of high quality, personalised teaching. It may take the form of additional support within the school setting or require involvement of specialist staff or support services.

 

Who is responsible for teaching and monitoring children with SEND?

At Bitterley CE Primary School all teachers are responsible and accountable for the progress and development of all the children in their class including those with special educational needs or disability. High-quality teaching which takes into account the individual needs of all children is our first step in responding to children who have special educational needs or disability. Teachers will use a range of strategies to ensure that children keep up rather than catch up. There will however, be times when the curriculum is differentiated for individual children to meet their particular needs.

 

Bitterley CE Primary School has a Special Educational Needs and Disability Co-ordinator (SENDCo) Miss B Jones. She is responsible for the management of provision and support for identified children with SEND. She also guides and supports teachers and teaching assistants to enable them to provide appropriate assessment and focused provision for children in their class with SEND. She can be contacted by emailing the school admin@Bitterley.shropshire.sch.uk or by telephoning the school to make an appointment on 01584 890228

 

How do we consult with parents of children with SEND and involve them in their child’s education?

At Bitterley we aim to work in partnership with all parents to ensure that the best possible provision is put in place for all children. Class teachers are available at the beginning and end of each day or by appointment.

Parents are consulted regularly throughout the time their child is at school and their views and/or wishes are recognised and if appropriate and wherever possible acted upon.

 

We will have an early discussion with the child and their parents when identifying whether they need special educational provision. These conversations will make sure that:

•         Everyone develops a good understanding of the pupil’s areas of strength and difficulty

•         We take into account the parents’ concerns

•         Everyone understands the agreed outcomes sought for the child

•         Everyone is clear on what the next steps are

Notes of these early discussions will be taken and parents will be told when it is decided that a child will receive SEN support and be added to the SEND Register. It is at this point that a Pupil Centred Plan (PCP) will be drawn up in discussion with the parents and child.

 

There are least termly meeting with parents to discuss PCPs (pupil centred plans). Further meetings take place if necessary. This PCP will PLAN the next steps in their child’s learning including setting out the desired outcomes, outline what the school will DO to achieve these steps and REVIEW progress from the last plan.

 

When a child is referred to an outside agency, the parents are consulted and their views are recorded. Parents will usually be asked to meet the professional who is assessing their child; this takes place on the school site.

Following the assessment, the SENDCo and class teacher will meet with the parents to discuss the findings of any report that is written and how suggestions are to be implemented in school.

Parents of children who have an Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan are additionally invited to an annual review meeting with a member of the Local Authority and any other professionals involved with their child and their views are recorded as part of this meeting.

Shropshire Information, Advice and Support Service (IASS) is available to meet with you to discuss your child’s progress or any concerns you may have. You can contact Shropshire IASS on 01743 280019 or http://www.cabshropshire.org.uk/shropshire-iass/?fbclid=IwAR3K6cNwAkAiHINbmIQKd2ZKx4yehpYvWEJOBcteEFHTRprQ43ghVn4NDWI  or https://www.facebook.com/IASSShropshire

 

How do we consult with children with SEND and involve them in their education?

If a child has a PCP, class teachers discuss the outcomes with the child to make them aware of what they need to work towards.

Children are encouraged to work towards their outcomes during class work in collaboration with classroom staff.

The children are invited to the termly meetings to review their progress and set new outcomes.

If a child has an EHC plan, then he/she additionally is asked to contribute their views and thoughts for the annual review meeting.

 

How do we identify and assess children with SEND?

We will assess each pupil’s current skills and levels of attainment on entry, which will take into account information from previous settings and key stages, where appropriate. Also:

  • Through regulary liaison with the pre-school we find out if a child has had any involvement with outside agencies or if the parents/carers have any concerns.
  • Classroom staff keep careful track of the child and identify any barriers to learning.
  • Regular and focused observations of the child will be made
  • Professional judgements will be used to identify and assess whether a child has special educational needs
  • Assessment within each lesson, termly assessments, including standardised assessment scores and national assessments such as SATs and the year 1 phonic screening will be used to inform our judgement
  • Observations of children in class, at lunchtimes, breaktimes etc
  • Regular meetings with the Head teacher and SENDCo where performance and progress of each child is tracked – both against national targets and personal targets.

 

To decide whether special educational provision is required, progress of the child will:

    • Be significantly slower than that of their peers starting from the same baseline
    • Fail to match or better the child’s previous rate of progress
    • Fail to close the attainment gap between the child and their peers
    • Widen the attainment gap
    • Be negatively impacted due to significant social, emotional and mental health needs

Slow progress and low attainment will not automatically mean a pupil is recorded as having SEN.

 

Teachers do not diagnose conditions.

 

If progress is not being made after three cycles of plan do review, then either other interventions are implemented or a referral is made to an outside agency such as an LSAT from Severndale Outreach, SALT, Educational Psychologist, Occupational Therapist, Sensory Inclusion, CAMHs.  Parents can also request an assessment by visiting their GP.

 

Shropshire Community Health organise various health checks from Reception to Year 6. These include: height and weight; sight and hearing. The outcome of this is reported to parents/carers and school. Action is taken as appropriate.

 

What kinds of special educational needs are provided for at our school?

Our school is an inclusive school where every child matters; we aim to address children’s needs and support their development in the most appropriate way possible and celebrate effort and progress as much as achievement. Our school’s SEND policy document is available on this website, detailing our philosophy in relation to SEND.

We refer to the term “Special Educational Needs” if a child:

a. Has significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of children of his or her age in one or more areas of learning.

b. Has a disability which either prevents or hinders him or her from making use of educational facilities of a kind generally provided in schools within the area of the Local Authority concerned for children of similar age.

 

  • Extra-curricular activities and school visits are available to all our children, including Before and After School Clubs
  • All children are encouraged to go on our residential trip
  • All children are encouraged to take part in sports day/school plays/special workshops etc
  • No pupil is ever excluded from taking part in these activities because of their SEN or disability

 

Additional and/or different provision may be made in school for children with a range of needs, including:

  • Communication and Interaction – autistic spectrum condition, Asperger’s Syndrome, selective mutism, speech and language difficulties.
  • Cognition and Learning – Moderate learning difficulties; Specific learning difficulties - dyslexia, dyspraxia.
  • Social, Emotional and Mental Health – attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. 
Sensory, Medical and Physical – hearing impairment, sensory processing difficulties, epilepsy.

 

How are adaptations made to the curriculum and the learning environment of children with SEND?
Adaptations to the curriculum are made according to need. The child may have needs in one or more of the following categories: Communication and Interaction, Cognition and Learning, Social, Mental and Emotional Health and Sensory, Medical and Physical. The tables below show how adaptations may be made for each of these categories of need. 

 

Communication and Interaction

  

Children may have a delay or disorder in one or more of the following areas:

How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum

How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs

Attention/interaction skills: May have difficulty ignoring distractions. Need reminders to keep attention. May need regular prompts to stay on task. May need individualised motivation in order to complete tasks. Difficulty attending in whole class. Interaction will not always be appropriate. May have peer relationship difficulties. May not be able to initiate or maintain a conversation.

Understanding Receptive Language: May need visual support to understand or process spoken language. May need augmented communication systems. Frequent misunderstandings. Repetition of language and some basic language needs to be used to aid their understanding

Speech/Expressive Language: May use simplified language and limited vocabulary. Ideas/conversations may be difficult to follow, with the need to request frequent clarification. Some immaturities in the speech sound system. Grammar/phonological awareness still fairly poor and therefore their literacy could be affected.

Staff model correct use of language by subtle repetition

Children are given more opportunities to share their ideas with others – ‘show and tell’, initially small groups moving onto larger groups and then the whole class.

Pre-taught new vocabulary

Targeted use of drama

 

Follow specific recommendations from specialist agencies.

Use of buddy system

Refer children to the speech and language service for support and advice.

Provide trained teaching assistants to run speech and language programmes in school. This may be on a one to one basis or in small groups.

Regular feedback to parents/carers giving suggestions of how they can help their children at home.

Whole school oracy policy

Visual timetables

Scaffolding within lessons

Use of Mabel (school dog) as a talk partner

Talk partners

 

 

 

Cognition and Learning

  

May have difficulties with the skills needed for effective learning such as use of:

How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum

How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs

  • Language memory and reading skills
  • Sequencing and organisational skills
  • An understanding of number
  • Problem solving and concept development skills
  • Fine and gross motor skills
  • Independent learning skills
  • Exercising choice
  • Decision making
  • Information processing

Children may have a specific learning disability such as dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia or dysgraphia

Clear expectations

Provide pre-teaching opportunities

Specific interventions to aid children to develop the skills that they require to be able to access the curriculum.

Provide adaptations to the curriculum or style of teaching to cater for individual needs eg giving clear, precise and direct instruction

Prompt sheets/cards

Extra time to complete tasks and tests

Simple verbal/written instructions

Tasks given in small steps/amount of work at a time

Use of mind maps to organise thoughts and ideas

Providing support from the teacher or the TAs in small groups or on an individual basis, within the classroom

Access and liaison with OT/Physiotherapist

Follow advice from outside agencies

Purchase of resources to support children when appropriate.

A place for time out-Calming Corner

Daily Readers

Overlays

Yellow paper

Touch typing activities such as BBC Dance Mat

Cool Kids programme

Regular feedback to parents/carers giving them suggestions of how they can help their child at home.

Scaffolding within lessons

Pre teaching interventions

Word banks and word mats

Focus on vocabulary

Use of spelling Shed

Use of maths equipment

Oracy focus

Visual timetable

Focus on reading

Working with Mabel the school dog- reading partner

 

Cognition and Learning

  

May have difficulties with the skills needed for effective learning such as use of:

How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum

How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs

  • Language memory and reading skills
  • Sequencing and organisational skills
  • An understanding of number
  • Problem solving and concept development skills
  • Fine and gross motor skills
  • Independent learning skills
  • Exercising choice
  • Decision making
  • Information processing

Children may have a specific learning disability such as dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia or dysgraphia

Clear expectations

Provide pre-teaching opportunities

Specific interventions to aid children to develop the skills that they require to be able to access the curriculum.

Provide adaptations to the curriculum or style of teaching to cater for individual needs eg giving clear, precise and direct instruction

Prompt sheets/cards

Extra time to complete tasks and tests

Simple verbal/written instructions

Tasks given in small steps/amount of work at a time

Use of mind maps to organise thoughts and ideas

Providing support from the teacher or the TAs in small groups or on an individual basis, within the classroom

Access and liaison with OT/Physiotherapist

Follow advice from outside agencies

Purchase of resources to support children when appropriate.

A place for time out-Calming Corner

Daily Readers

Overlays

Yellow paper

Touch typing activities such as BBC Dance Mat

Cool Kids programme

Regular feedback to parents/carers giving them suggestions of how they can help their child at home.

Scaffolding within lessons

Pre teaching interventions

Word banks and word mats

Focus on vocabulary

Use of spelling Shed

Use of maths equipment

Oracy focus

Visual timetable

Focus on reading

Working with Mabel the school dog- reading partner

 

Social, Mental and Emotional Health

  

May have difficulties with social and emotional development which may lead to or stem from:

How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum

How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs

  • Social isolation
  • Behaviour difficulties
  • Attention difficulties (ADHD)
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Attachment disorders
  • Low self esteem
  • Issues with self-image

 

 

Providing support – having a designated adult to work with the pupil

Having a calm area where the child can have ‘time out’.

Children are encouraged to work with others within a small group with the support of an adult

Children are encouraged to share their ideas with others and adults model how to take turns, share and negotiate with their peers.

Consistent routines/boundaries and expectations of behaviour

Being sensitive to the needs of individual children, taking into account their personal circumstances.

Being sensitive to any resources being used.

A place for time out- Calming Corner

Small group ‘Circle Time’

Home School Behaviour Books

Friends for Life, No Worries programme

Refer to outside agencies as appropriate eg bereavement counselling, BeeU (CAMHs)

Advice followed from BeeU (CAMHs) or other agencies

Extra visits to Secondary Schools

Supporting families with multiagency involvement

During unstructured times support staff and supervisors made aware of the needs of specific children.

Mabel the school dog- focused timeout sessions

Carefully planned seating arrangements both in and out of school

Calm learning environment

Sensory items when required

Brain and active breaks

Whole school awareness days

Daily mindfulness sessions

Parent information- inclusion

 

 

Sensory, Medical and Physical

  

These children may have a medical or genetic condition that could lead to difficulties with:

How we adapt teaching to ensure access to the curriculum

How we provide support and intervention for those with identified needs

  • Specific medical conditions
  • Gross/fine motor skills
  • Visual/hearing impairment
  • Accessing the curriculum without adaptation
  • Physically accessing the building or equipment
  • Over sensitivity to noise/smells/light/touch/taste.
  • Toileting/self-care

Children are provided with suitable equipment on advice from outside agencies eg pencil grips, writing slopes, stress balls etc

Ensure tables and chairs are the correct size for the children

PE sessions with TA support if appropriate

Ensure the environment is free from clutter and is tidy and organised

 

A place for time out- Calming Corner

Access and liaison with OT/ Physiotherapist

Referral to outside agency

Pre-writing skills eg tweezers, peg boards

Use of specialised equipment in the classroom as suggested by outside agencies

School is all one level with ramps to get inside

Carefully planned seating arrangements

Use of IT on recommendation from outside agencies

 

 

How do we support children moving between different phases of education?

From pre-school to Raindrop Class.

  • Visits from the class teacher to pre-school settings.
  • A series of induction visits during the Summer Term before the child starts in September.
  • Class teacher meets with pre-school providers for an exchange of information.
  • Each child has a Year 6 and Year 2 Buddy.
  • Class teacher holds interviews with the parents before they start school full time.
  • Parents evening during the Summer Term for parents of children starting in September.

 

From Class to Class within the School.

  • Children will have a ‘taster session’ in their new class.
  • Teachers liaise to share PCPs and other information and reports.
  • Progress data is shared.

 

Children in Year 6 moving to Secondary School.

  • We work closely with our local secondary schools. The year 7 coordinators will visit the children in Bitterley Primary School.
  • The SENDCo and year 7 co-ordinator are invited to attend the annual review meeting of any child with an EHC plan.
  • The Year 6 class teacher will meet with the SENDCo and year 7 coordinator of the secondary school the child is moving to in order to share information and discuss the specific needs of the pupil.
  • Extra induction visits may be arranged to the secondary school if appropriate.
  • There may be a small group set up in school to help those children who may find the change hardest.

 

What is the level of expertise and training of staff in relation to children with SEND and how will specialist expertise be secured?

Our SENCO is very experienced in this role and has worked at Bitterley for many years, meaning that she is able to understand and meet the needs of our families. She is allocated time each week to manage SEN provision.

We have a team of eight teaching assistants, including three who work in the nursery.

 

The school enjoys good working relationships with a wide range of professionals who provide specialist services to children with SEND and their families. The external specialists may:

  • Act in an advisory capacity
  • Extend expertise of school staff
  • Provide additional assessment
  • Support a child directly
  • Suggest statutory assessment is advisable
  • Consult with all parties involved with the child
We secure specialist expertise by using our additional needs budget. This is used to support children and young people with SEND. If a child has complex special educational needs, we could also receive additional funding from the Local Authority to meet the agreed outcomes

 

How is the effectiveness of provision for children with SEND evaluated?

The Headteacher and SEN Local Academy Board Member oversee the provision of special educational needs. They monitor carefully the progress of children with SEND, the impact of any interventions and meet regularly with the SENDCo and class teachers.

We evaluate the effectiveness of provision for pupils with SEND by:

  • Reviewing pupils’ individual progress towards their outcomes each term
  • Review the impact of any interventions
  • Using pupil questionnaires
  • Monitoring by the SENCO
  • Using provision maps to measure progress
  • Holding annual reviews for pupils with EHC plans

 

How does the Local Academy Board involve other bodies, including health and social services bodies, local authority support services and voluntary organisations in meeting the needs of children with SEND and in supporting the families of such children?

External support services play an important part in helping school identify, assess and make provision for children with special educational needs. Our school receives regular visits from a member of the Educational Psychology Service. In addition, school may seek advice from specialist advisory teachers for children with sensory impairment or physical/medical difficulties or social communication difficulties, such as the school nurse or specialist nurses eg Tourette’s. The speech and language therapy and occupational therapy services (NHS) involved with individual children support school in the implementation of specific programmes and contribute to the monitoring of progress and reviews of children.

School maintains links with child health services, children’s social care services and education welfare services to ensure that all relevant information is considered when making provision for our children with SEND.

 

What are the arrangements for handling complaints from parents of children with SEND about the provision made at school?

We urge parents/carers with any concerns regarding the SEND policy or the provision made for their child at Bitterley CE Primary School to speak to us as soon as possible.

In the first instance, please speak to the class teacher or the SENDCo. If parents/carers feel their child's needs are still not being met they should make an appointment to see the Headteacher or a member of the Local Academy Board.

If concerns continue to be unresolved parents may wish to use the Shropshire Information, Advice and Support Service (SIASS) http://www.cabshropshire.org.uk/shropshire-iass/?fbclid=IwAR3K6cNwAkAiHINbmIQKd2ZKx4yehpYvWEJOBcteEFHTRprQ43ghVn4NDW  or engage with the School complaints procedures. Bitterley CE Primary School is part of the Diocese of Hereford Multi Academy Trust. Their complaints policy can be found here